Wellbeing Land the job you want February 28 2020
Trudie McConnochie Trudie McConnochie Writer

Is this your last year studying? There’s no better time to start planning you next move for after you graduate.

One minute you’re choosing courses and creating study plans, the next you’ve made it to your last year on campus. Time flies (or not!) when you’re studying, that’s for sure. Right now you’re probably focusing on doing the best you can in your studies, but if you can carve out some time to think about what kind of job you’d like to go after, it could give an edge in the job market. Here are some great tips to maximise your chances of securing the job of your dreams (or at least, the first stage of your dreams!). 

Seek out work experience

Even if it’s not related to your field, work experience shows potential employers that you’ve gained professional skills. Having a casual job can also help your résumé stand out — even if you’re working in an unrelated field. Internships and mentoring programs , too, are useful — find out what your uni, TAFE or college offers in your industry. You could even do freelance work or consider starting a business with friends. Learn more about going freelance here, or find out how to set up a business here. 

Expand your interests

It’s not just your academic skills that employers will prize, it’s also your experience beyond study. That’s why doing extra-curricular activities on campus and volunteer work in the community now will work in your favour later. Plus, some of those clubs and societies are great vehicles for networking (more on that later). Showing you’ve got interests beyond the workplace is also helpful — for example, the leadership skills you’ve gained in your Saturday morning cricket team could impress a potential employer.

Land the job you want

Get networking

Signing up to job sites is great, but lots of jobs are not advertised, with recruitment happening through networks. That means meeting key people and staying in touch with them could pay dividends — not only for accessing under-the-radar jobs, but for having people who can vouch for you to potential employers. Opportunities to network come up through friends, industry events, careers fairs, online and more. If you don’t know many people locally, LinkedIn could be a great place to start.

Keep in mind that networking should be a two-way street — helping others will make them more likely to help you. 

Finesse your résumé

Your résumé is often the first impression of you employers get, so it’s a good idea to talk to a teacher or careers adviser on campus to get tips on nailing it. You could download a professional CV template to get you started (there are lots available online). You’ll need to include your contact details, an opening statement, education, work experience and references — and don’t forget volunteering and extra-curricular activities. Make sure you leave off personal information such as your age and marital status. 

Top tip: ask your teachers and lecturers to write reference letters (if you have a good relationship with them).

Clean up your online image

Potential employers may run online searches to make sure you’re a good fit for the culture of their organisation, so make sure that what they’ll find reflects well on you. Google yourself to see what comes up, and make sure it’s workplace appropriate. Adjust privacy settings on your social media if necessary, delete content that casts you in a negative light and deactivate old accounts. 

On the plus side, you can use your online presence to your advantage by posting industry-relevant articles on LinkedIn and (if appropriate to your field) creating online portfolios that showcase your creativity. 

Students Wellbeing Learn more about our Overseas Student Health Cover

Visit our OSHC Student Hub for information on your cover plus tips on what to do if you’re sick, how to make claims and more.  

Find out more
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Trudie McConnochie Trudie McConnochie Writer Trudie McConnochie is a Sydney-based journalist who specialises in health, wellbeing and spirituality.

Australian Government. Starting a business guide [Online; accessed February 2020] Available from: business.gov.au

Deakin University. How to clean up your online image before a job search [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: this.deakin.edu.au.

Deakin University. How to explore all options when you’re looking for a job [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: this.deakin.edu.au.

Deakin University. How to clean up your online image before a job search [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: www.this.deakin.edu.au

Deakin University. How to explore all options when you’re looking for a job [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: this.deakin.edu.au

Deakin University. Resume tips to get your first job [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: this.deakin.edu.au

Flinders University Student Association. 10 tips to land a graduate job [Online] 2016 [Accessed January 2020] Available from: fusa.edu.au

Reach Out. How to get a job after uni [Online; accessed January 2020] Available from: au.reachout.com

The Foundation for Young Australians. 6 tips for becoming a freelancer from someone who’s done it [Online; accessed February 2020] Available from: fya.org.au

The University of Sydney. Employability skills: 6 ways to get a job and keep it [Online] 2016 [Accessed January 2020] Available from: sydney.edu.au